• Everlane is joining the sneaker hype, but instead of releasing sneakers under the Everlane banner, it’s launching its own sneaker line called Tread, the first style of which is 94.2% plastic-free.
    • Takeaway: As Everlane taps into a $100 billion dollar industry, there are two developments to watch: First, releasing Tread as its own brand mimics Glossier’s recent launch of Glossier Play, which segments each company’s audience. Second, though Everlane initially rejected the idea of opening any offline retail, it’s now planning to open a third location in Williamsburg, NY and a pop-up in LA, pointing to the need for physical stores for its growing shoe business.
  • After a tumultuous 2018, Deciem is attempting to recover from the sudden death of its founder. Their strategy? Add kindness into the culture.
  • JCPenney thought no one would notice it dropped Apple Pay—until it was outed on Twitter. The retailer cites one major credit card company’s mandate to retire legacy MSD (magnetic stripe data) when contactless payment is in use as the reasoning behind the decision.
    • Takeaway: JCPenny has long struggled to draw in a younger customer base. But the unwillingness to drop legacy payment methods signals that its customer remains part of an older demographic that is slower to adopt new technologies anyways—let alone give up their coupons.
  • Some real estate developers aren’t taking the questionable future of malls lightly. In an effort to drive traffic, Westfield has started offering Uber vouchers to encourage more shopping trips.
  • Another brand has joined the transparency movement. H&M will provide customers with supplier information for all of its garments, including factory names, addresses and countries. The information will be available online or by using an app in store.